Menu

Brownlow Primary School

Happy, Healthy, High Achieving

Interactive Bar

Google Services

Translate

Translate

Search

Search

Brownlow Primary School

Happy, Healthy, High Achieving

School History

Brownlow School has a unique history and place in the hearts and lives of many a resifent of Melton Mowbray.

 

Take a stroll through our history and and help us to celebrate the many achievements of the past.

Part of the 1990 front cover of The Melton Times, showing a pen illustration of the school, drawn by Brian Hollingshead.

Part of the 1990 front cover of The Melton Times, showing a pen illustration of the school, drawn by Brian Hollingshead. 1

Central Boys’ School opened by The Duke of Gloucester in 1933 before becoming Brownlow Primary School in 1952. Photograph supplied by Mr Taylor who opened the door for The Duke of Gloucester.

Central Boys’ School opened by The Duke of Gloucester in 1933 before becoming Brownlow Primary School in 1952.  Photograph supplied by Mr Taylor who opened the door for The Duke of Gloucester. 1

This is an edited version of an article written by Gilbert King in the Melton Times in April 1990.

 

The school was built in 1928 as the Modern School for Boys. At that time it had eight classrooms, science laboratories and rooms for teaching practical subjects along with a library and staff room. It was described in 1933 as being a quadrangular building with an open court for physical education. On the south side it had an assembly hall, main entrances and cloakrooms. A covered way on the west side gave access to the dining hall with its own kitchen. We know this building as the Annex.

 

The Modern School for Boys was officially opened in 1933 by the Duke of Gloucester, although the boys had moved into the building after Easter in 1929.

 

By the time of the School’s Silver Jubilee in 1954 the main building had been extended to include larger science laboratories, metal work rooms, two new classrooms, and a Gymnasium with showers and cloakrooms.

 

The dining hall block which opened in 1930 had, by 1954, been converted to a classroom and a woodwork area. A larger, more up-to-date dining hall and kitchen had replaced the old one in 1949.

 

In 1953 an ornamental garden and fishpond were made by the boys to commemorate the Coronation of the Queen.

 

The Modern School for Boys had a very large catchment area from Tilton in the south to Kinoulton in the north, and from Hoby in the west to Buckminster in the east. This included about 40 feeder schools in the area around Melton.

 

The school was designed for 400 boys, but as the post war ‘bulge’ arrived the school population rose to around 900 with about 50 pupils in a class.

 

Mr Charles Goldspink was the school’s first headmaster . He lived in Melton and was a fine musician. In 1944 Mr John H. Tims took over as headmaster until 1964 when the Melton schools were reorganised.

 

In 1964 a new mixed school called John Ferneley was built and the Sarson Modern School for Girls became a mixed school. At the same time King Edward VII Grammar school became an upper school catering for a wide range of pupils.

 

This scheme freed the Limes Avenue school so that Brownlow could move in. They had been using the Wilton Road building which we now know as the Library. The building needed to be adapted from its former use for the 11-14 age group to being suitable for infants and juniors.

 

The headmistress was Miss M. Shepherd who retired in 1982 to be replaced by Miss S. Korczak, who, at the time Gilbert Green wrote his article in 1990, was the current headteacher.
Top